• FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONSRESULTS AND EFFECTIVENESS

    WHY IS READING RECOVERY TAUGHT ONE-TO-ONE RATHER THAN IN SMALL GROUPS?

    One-to-one instruction by a Reading Recovery-trained teacher is the most effective way to bring lowest-performing beginning readers up to grade-level standard. Students complete Reading Recovery in 12 to 20 weeks of 30-minute lessons. No other early intervention, group or individual, achieves results comparable to Reading Recovery’s.

    See the What Works Clearinghouse evaluation at www.readingrecovery.org.

    DO READING RECOVERY STUDENTS CONTINUE TO PROGRESS IN SUBSEQUENT YEARS?

    Yes. Multiple research and evaluation studies using widely accepted measures and state assessments have documented continued progress. Studies con rm that most students with a full series of lessons keep pace with their peers throughout succeeding years.

    See continued progress research at www.readingrecovery.org.

    DOES READING RECOVERY WORK WITH ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS?

    Yes. After Reading Recovery, outcomes for English language learners are similar to those of native English speakers. Descubriendo la Lectura (Reading Recovery in Spanish) also achieves parallel results for children learning to read in Spanish.

    See effectiveness research at www.readingrecovery.org.

    DOES READING RECOVERY REDUCE ACHIEVEMENT GAPS?

    Yes. Research and evaluation data con rm that Reading Recovery greatly reduces or closes achievement gaps across varying racial and ethnic groups, socioeconomic groups, and for English language learners.

    See effectiveness research at www.readingrecovery.org.
    HOW DOES READING RECOVERY FIT INTO RESPONSE TO INTERVENTION (RTI)?

    Reading Recovery is a powerful component of a response
    to intervention (RTI) plan. By monitoring individual progress daily, Reading Recovery teachers make informed instructional decisions based on each student’s abilities. All children make progress throughout the lessons, but for the few who do not reach grade-level standard, educators have excellent data to consult when planning additional services. Reading Recovery helps schools avoid unnecessary special education placements.

    RESEARCH, MEASUREMENT, ACCOUNTABILITY

    WHAT IS THE EVIDENCE THAT READING RECOVERY WORKS?

    Reading Recovery has required data collection and research since its beginnings, perhaps making it the
    most fully researched early reading program in the world. The What Works Clearinghouse independent review
    of Reading Recovery’s experimental research clearly establishes the effectiveness of the intervention based
    on scienti c evidence. In addition to this strong research evidence, the International Data Evaluation Center (IDEC) at The Ohio State University collects results for each child in Reading Recovery.

    Evaluation reports are available at the national, state, school district, training site, and school level. (See national reports online at https://www.idecweb.us.)

    IS THE OBSERVATION SURVEY OF EARLY LITERACY ACHIEVEMENT VALID AND RELIABLE?

    Validity and reliability have been documented and
    The Observation Survey received the highest ratings on
    these measures from the National Center on Response
    to Intervention. In addition, the Observation Survey highly correlates with the Iowa Test of Basic Skills. Published national norms are available to assist with interpretation of scores.
    READINGRECOVERYWORKS.ORG
    OUICK ANSWERS TO COMMON OUESTIONS
    FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

    COST AND FUNDING

    IS READING RECOVERY EXPENSIVE?

    Reading Recovery is an investment toward teacher professional development, reducing retention and unnecessary long-term placements in special education.
    As an effective response to intervention it also helps identify children who may need additional support. A 2006 study from Great Britain by the KPMG Foundation on the Long Term Costs of Literacy Dif culties documents the savings. In a more recent report designed for school administrators, researchers developed a decision-making checklist and worksheet with calculation formulas to determine the cost effectiveness of a new literacy intervention.

    See cost-effectiveness research at www.readingrecovery.org.

    HOW ARE SOME ADMINISTRATORS IMPLEMENTING READING RECOVERY WITHOUT INCREASED FTEs OR STAFF POSITIONS?

    School administrators have considerable exibility in how they staff Reading Recovery. Teachers in this role need to be able to teach four individual 30-minute lessons each day in addition to their other roles within the school. These teachers may

    be kindergarten or primary-grade teachers, Title I teachers, intervention specialists, teachers of ELL or special education, or literacy coaches and administrators. On average, the teachers working in Reading Recovery use their expertise to support an additional 40 students in their other instructional roles. Reading Recovery instruction and training is intensive, so administrators must ensure that teachers have adequate time and compensation for their work with the lowest- achieving rst-grade children.
    TEACHER DEVELOPMENT
    AND WHOLE SCHOOL BENEFITS

    WHY IS A FULL ACADEMIC YEAR OF TRAINING REQUIRED FOR A READING RECOVERY TEACHER?

    Knowledgeable teachers offer the best value to struggling students. Teachers trained in Reading Recovery complete graduate-level classwork while teaching at least eight
    Reading Recovery students during the course of the year.
    This combination of theory and practice develops teachers who know what to do, why it works, and how to adjust teaching based on a child’s capabilities and needs. After the initial year’s training, teachers attend at least six ongoing professional development sessions a year. Both training and ongoing professional development include teaching, observing, and discussing lessons taught behind a one-way mirror.

    No packaged program substitutes for an informed teacher’s design and delivery of individual lessons for each child.

    IF READING RECOVERY IS A FIRST-GRADE INTERVENTION, HOW DOES IT BENEFIT THE WHOLE SCHOOL?

    Reading Recovery-trained teachers become literacy leaders, sharing knowledge with their colleagues and lifting literacy expertise across the school or district. On average, a Reading Recovery-trained teacher works with 48 students a year –

    8 students one-to-one, and about 40 more students in small reading groups, classrooms, and special education settings.

    WHO SHOULD I CONTACT TO FIND OUT MORE ABOUT READING RECOVERY?

    To learn more about implementing Reading Recovery in your school district, contact the Reading Recovery Council of North America online at ReadingRecoveryWorks.org
    or call 614-310-READ (7323) or 1-877-883-READ (7323).
    “Reading Recovery has one clear goal: To dramatically reduce the number of learners who have extreme dif culty with literacy learning and the cost of these learners to educational systems.”

    – MARIE M. CLAY, Founder, Reading Recovery
    Learn how Reading Recovery can provide lasting results at ReadingRecoveryWorks.org