• Standards this Quarter


     

     

    Reading

    RI.4.1 : Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.

    RI.4.2 : Determine the main idea of a text and explain how it is supported by key details; summarize the text.

    RI.4.3 : Explain events, procedures, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text, including what happened and why, based on specific information in the text.

    RI.4.4 : Determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words or phrases in a text relevant to a grade 4 topic or subject area.

    RI.4.5 : Describe the overall structure (e.g., chronology, comparison, cause/effect, problem/solution) of events, ideas, concepts, or information in a text or part of a text.

    RI.4.6 : Compare and contrast a firsthand and secondhand account of the same event or topic; describe the differences in focus and the information provided.

    RI.4.7 : Interpret information presented visually, orally, or quantitatively (e.g., in charts, graphs, diagrams, time lines, animations, or interactive elements on Web pages) and explain how the information contributes to an understanding of the text in which it appears.

    RI.4.8 : Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text.

    RI.4.9 : Integrate information from two texts on the same topic in order to write or speak about the subject knowledgeably.

    RF.4.10 : Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension.
    a. Read grade-level text with purpose and understanding.
    c. Use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding, rereading as necessary.

    Writing

    W.4.2 (a-e) : Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly.

    a. Introduce a topic clearly and group related information in paragraphs and sections; include formatting (e.g., headings), illustrations, and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
    b. Develop the topic with facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples related to the topic.
    c. Link ideas within categories of information using words and phrases (e.g., another,for example, also, because).
    d. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic.
    e. a concluding statement or section related to the information or explanation presented.

    W.4.4 : Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1-3 above.)

    W.4.5 : With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, and editing. (Editing for conventions should demonstrate command of Language standards 1-3 up to and including grade 4 here.)

    W.4.6 : With some guidance and support from adults, use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing as well as to interact and collaborate with others; demonstrate sufficient command of keyboarding skills to type a minimum of one page in a single sitting.

    W.4.7 : Conduct short research projects that build knowledge through investigation of different aspects of a topic.

    W.4.9.B : Apply grade 4 Reading standards to informational texts (e.g., "Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text").

    W.4.10 : Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

     

    math

    OA.4.1-Interpret a multiplication equation as a comparison, e.g., interpret 35 = 5 × 7 as a statement that 35 is 5 times as many as 7 and 7 times as many as 5. Represent verbal statements of multiplicative comparisons as multiplication equations.

    OA.4.2-Multiply or divide to solve word problems involving multiplicative comparison, e.g., by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem, distinguishing multiplicativecomparison from additive comparison.

    OA.4.3- Solve multistep word problems posed with whole numbers and having whole-number answers using the four operations, including problems in which remainders must

    be interpreted. Represent these problems using equations with a letter standing for the unknown quantity. Assess the reasonableness of answers using mental computation and

    estimation strategies including rounding.

    OA.4.4- Find all factor pairs for a whole number in the range 1–100. Recognize that a whole number is a multiple of each of its factors. Determine whether a given whole number in the range 1–100 is a multiple of a given one- digit number. Determine whether a given whole number in the range 1–100 is prime or composite.

     

    NBT.4.1-Recognize that in a multi-digit whole number, a digit in one place represents ten times what it represents in the place to its right. For example, recognize that 700 ÷ 70 = 10 by applying concepts of place value and division.

    NBT.4.5-Multiply a whole number of up to four digits by a one-digit whole number, and multiply two two-digit numbers, using strategies based on place value and the properties of operations. Illustrate and explain the calculation by using equations, rectangular arrays, and/or area models.

    NBT.4.6-Find whole-number quotients and remainders with up to four-digit dividends and one-digit divisors, using strategies based on place value, the properties of operations, and/or the relationship between multiplication and division. Illustrate and explain the calculation by using equations, rectangular arrays, and/or area models.

     MD.4.3-Apply the area and perimeter formulas for rectangles in real world and mathematical problems. For example, find the width of a rectangular room

    given the area of the flooring and the length, by viewing the area formula as a multiplication equation with an unknown factor.

    MD.4.5-Recognize angles as geometric shapes that are formed wherever two rays share a common endpoint, and understand concepts of angle measurement: a. An angle is measured with reference to a circle with its center at the common endpoint of the rays, by considering the fraction of the circular arc between the points where the two rays intersect

    the circle. An angle that turns through 1/360 of a circle is called a “one-degree angle,” and can be used to measure angles. b. An angle that turns through none-degree angles is

    said to have an angle measure of n degrees.

    MD.4.6-Measure angles in whole-number degrees using a protractor. Sketch angles of specified measure.

    MD.4.7-Recognize angle measure as additive. When an angle is decomposed into non-overlapping parts, the angle measure of the whole is the sum of the angle measures of the parts. Solve addition and subtraction problems to find unknown angles on a diagram in real world and mathematical problems, e.g., by using an equation with a symbol for the unknown angle measure.

     

    G.4.1-Draw points, lines, line segments, rays, angles (right, acute, obtuse), and perpendicular and parallel lines. Identify these in two-dimensional figures.

    G.4.2-Classify two-dimensional figures based on the presence or absence of parallel or perpendicular lines, or the presence or absence of angles of a specified size. Recognize right triangles as a category, and identify right triangles.

    G.4.3- Recognize a line of symmetry for a two-dimensional figure as a line across the figure such that the figure can be folded along the line into matching parts. Identify line- symmetric figures and draw lines of symmetry.

     

    Social Studies
    4.H.1 Analyze the chronology of key historical events in North Carolina history. 4.H.1.1 Summarize the change in cultures, everyday life and status of indigenous American Indian groups in North Carolina before and after European exploration.

    4.H.2 Understand how notable structures, symbols and place names are significant to North Carolina. 

    4.G.1 Understand how human, environmental and technological factors affect the growth and development of North Carolina. 

    4.E.1 Understand how a market economy impacts life in North Carolina.

    4.E.2 Understand the economic factors when making personal choices. 

    4.C.1 Understand the impact of various cultural groups on North Carolina.